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Elements of an essay topic sentence

elements of an essay topic sentence


The four elements essential to good paragraph writing are: unity, order, coherence, and completeness.
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Unity: Unity in a sentence starts with the subject phrase. Every sentence has one individual, managing concept that is indicated in its subject phrase, which is generally the first phrase of the sentence. A sentence is specific around this main concept, with the assisting phrases offering details and conversation. In order to create a good subject phrase, think about your style and all the details you want to make. Choose which point pushes the relax, and then create it as your subject sentence.

Order:
Order represents the way you arrange your assisting phrases. Whether you choose date order, order of importance, or another reasonable demonstration of detail, a solid sentence always has a certain organization. In a well-ordered sentence, people follows along easily, with the design you’ve established. Order helps people understanding your indicating and avoid misunderstandings.

Coherence
:Coherence is the quality that makes your writing understandable. Sentences within a paragraph need to connect to each other and work together as a whole. One of the best ways to achieve coherency is to use transition words. These words create bridges from one sentence to the next. You can use transition words that show order (first, second, third); spatial relationships (above, below) or logic (furthermore, in addition, in fact). Also, in writing a paragraph, using a consistent verb tense and point of view are important ingredients for coherency.

completeness:Completeness means a expression is well-developed. If all words clearly and properly assistance the significant idea, then your expression is complete. If there are not enough words or enough information to confirm your dissertation, then the expression is partial. Usually three assisting words, moreover to a topic expression and completing expression, are needed for a expression to be complete. The completing expression or last expression of the expression should sum up your significant idea by strengthening your topic expression.

Elements Of A Paragraph

A phrase should contain some framework and particular elements, which are outlined below in comparative order:

1.A Subject sentence- inspires people to want to study more.

2.The First major point- shows, supports up, or describes the patient phrase.

3.The Second major point- usually provides a purpose for the first factor created.

4.The Third major point- can help confirm the patient phrase or back up the first or second major factor of the phrase.

5.The Conclusion- amounts up the aspects or thoughts and it usually does the patient.

Essential Elements - Paragraph Writing

Order helps people understanding your indicating and avoid misunderstandings.

Coherence
:Coherence is the quality that makes your writing understandable. Sentences within a paragraph need to connect to each other and work together as a whole. One of the best ways to achieve coherency is to use transition words. These words create bridges from one sentence to the next. You can use transition words that show order (first, second, third); spatial relationships (above, below) or logic (furthermore, in addition, in fact). If all words clearly and properly assistance the significant idea, then your expression is complete. If there are not enough words or enough information to confirm your dissertation, then the expression is partial. Usually three assisting words, moreover to a topic expression and completing expression, are needed for a expression to be complete. The completing expression or last expression of the expression should sum up your significant idea by strengthening your topic expression.

Elements Of A Paragraph

A phrase should contain some framework and particular elements, which are outlined below in comparative order:

1.

In this lesson, in addition to learning how to identify nouns, you'll learn the difference between proper and common nouns and a bit about how nouns function in sentences.

2. Singular & Plural Nouns: Definitions, Rules & Examples

This video takes a look at how singular nouns are turned into plural nouns. Check it out to learn about regular and irregular plurals as well as important definitions, rules, and exceptions.

3. What Are Possessive Nouns? - Examples, Definition & Types

This video explains what you need to know to use apostrophes to make singular and plural nouns possessive. You'll also learn how to avoid mixing up your plurals and possessives.

4.

5. What Are Pronouns? - Types, Examples & Definition

In this lesson, we'll learn about pronouns in general, and take a look at two types of personal pronouns: subjective case and objective case pronouns. Knowing which case of pronoun you'll need can help you avoid common pronoun errors.

6. Pronouns: Relative, Reflexive, Interrogative & Possessive

In this lesson, we'll look at relative, reflexive, interrogative and possessive pronouns. We'll do this by antagonizing our friend Gary with the whos, whats, whoms, and whichevers that make up these pronouns.

7. Using Nouns as the Subject of a Sentence: Grammar Rules & Examples

A subject is an essential part of a sentence.

Possessive Pronouns & Contractions: Definition & Examples

In writing, many people get possessive pronouns and contractions confused. In this lesson, we'll discuss the differences between the two, as well as how to use apostrophes in order to form contractions.

9. What is an Antecedent? - Definition, Meaning & Examples

If you have a pronoun in a sentence, you'll also need to have an antecedent. In this lesson, find out what an antecedent is as well as some of the basic rules for avoiding vague pronoun references and for making sure that you have pronoun-antecedent agreement.

10. Compound Antecedents: Definition & Examples

You may know already that an antecedent and its pronoun must agree in number.

Personal Pronouns and Antecedents: Number Agreement

In this lesson, you'll learn how to avoid one of the most common grammatical mistakes in writing by learning how to ensure that all of the antecedents in your writing agree in number with the pronouns that they're matched up with.

12. Action, Linking and Auxiliary Verbs: Definitions, Functions & Examples

Do you think that a verb is just a verb? Check out this lesson to learn about the differences among action verbs, linking verbs, and auxiliary/helping verbs.

13. Verb Forms: Participles & Infinitives

Using verbs correctly involves knowing more than just how to express action in a sentence.

Comparison of Adjectives & Adverbs: Examples, Sentences & Exercises

Adjectives and adverbs are descriptive words that allow our sentences to be much more specific and interesting than they would be without them. This lesson covers the rules for using adjectives and adverbs correctly, including those used in comparisons.

15. Indefinite and Definite Articles: Definition and Examples

Watch this video lesson on indefinite and definite articles. Find out when you should use which type of article and when you shouldn't use any article at all.

16. What Are Misplaced Modifiers and Dangling Modifiers?

I have this recurring nightmare where all my modifiers are misplaced or dangling and everybody's laughing at me.

Active and Passive Voice

No one likes a passive person, so why should you write in the passive voice? You may have heard your teachers toss around the terms 'passive voice' and 'active voice' You may have even been told not write in the former. But if you've never really understood what it means to write actively or passively, stick with us -- and learn how to turn to cludgy passive sentences into bright, active ones.

18. What are Predicates? - Definition and Examples

A predicate is a necessary component of each sentence, so it's important to know what one is and how to identify one. This lesson goes over the basics of predicates as well as how knowing about them can help answer other grammatical questions.

Body Paragraphs

Today, let’s take a look at body paragraphs and three of the elements that should be within each body paragraph. To write strong body paragraphs, you need to make sure they are structured clearly and organized well.

How Many Body Paragraphs Do I Need?

For high school papers, you will want to have two to three body paragraphs, depending on the requirements of your paper and the goal of your essay (clarified in your thesis statement).

What Does My Body Paragraph Need to Include?

Despite the number of body paragraphs in your essay, all of your body paragraphs should have the following elements:

A Topic Sentence

Transitions

Details

Commentary

Concluding/Transition Sentence

What Should My Body Paragraphs Look Like?

Your body paragraphs will change based on your assignment and goal. However, what you do for one body paragraph, you should do for all the others, as well.

Let’s take a look at three elements of body paragraphs: topic sentences, transition words, and concluding sentences.

Writing Topic Sentences

Your topic sentence tells the reader what you are going to be discussing throughout your whole body paragraph. The body paragraph should not stray from this topic. If it does, eliminate this information, or start a new body paragraph.

How Do I Write a Topic Sentence?

Some easy, yet powerful ways to begin a paragraph are to use the five W’s (who, what, where, when, why. . .or even how).

Let’s say we are writing a paper on bullying. Here is what each of these topic sentences could look like.

Starting with a WHO:

Many children have experienced some form of bullying.

Starting with a WHAT:

Bullying is harmful and can greatly affect children negatively.

Starting with a WHEN:

During lunch or after school when teachers are not around is when bullying often happens.

Starting with a WHERE:

At schools across the country, bullying has become a major issue.

Some more interesting and advanced ways to write topic sentences are:

Number Statements:

Bullying is such a major problem that three-quarters of all children have been bullied or teased.

Where or When + What’s Happening Statements:

When we see another student being bullied at school, we help by defending the student or telling an adult.

And, But, So Statements:

Bullying bothers everyone, so it should be discussed with students and prevented.

Action Verb Statements:

My friends and I were playing a game on the playground when I was first bullied by an older student.

Alike or Different Statements:

There are many different ways to react when being bullied.

Question and Answer Statement:

Why do some kids bully? Often times, they are looking to receive attention.

Transition Words

Why do I Need to Include Transition Words?

First of all, transition words make your essay clearer. Additionally, they connect the gaps in ideas.

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