11 08

How to summarize an essay or article

how to summarize an essay or article

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A journal article summary provides potential readers with a short descriptive commentary, giving them some insight into the article's focus. Writing and summarizing a journal article is a common task for college students and research assistants alike. With a little practice, you can learn to read the article effectively with an eye for summary, plan a successful summary, and write it to completion.

Steps

Part 1 Reading the Article

  1. 1

    Read the abstract. Abstracts are short paragraphs written by the author to summarize research articles. Abstracts are usually included in most academic journals and are generally no more than 100-200 words. The abstract provides a short summary of the content of the journal article, providing you with important highlights of the research study.
    • The purpose of an abstract is to allow researchers to quickly scan a journal and see if specific research articles are applicable to the work they are doing.
  • Remember that an abstract and an article summary are two different things, so an article summary that looks just like the abstract is a poor summary.[1] An abstract is highly condensed and cannot provide the same level of detail regarding the research and its conclusions that a summary can.[2]
  • 2

    Understand the context of the research. Make sure you know what specifically the authors will be discussing or analyzing, why the research or the topic matters, whether or not the article is written in response to another article on the topic, etc. By doing this, you'll learn what arguments, quotes, and data to pick out and analyze in your summary.

  • 3

    Skip to the conclusion. Skip ahead to the conclusion and find out where the proposed research ends up to learn more about the topic and to understand where the complicated outlines and arguments will be leading.
  • If you're collecting research, you may not need to digest another source that backs up your own if you're looking for some dissenting opinions.
  • 4

    Identify the main argument or position of the article. To avoid having to read through the whole thing twice to remind yourself of the main idea, make sure you get it right the first time. Take notes as you read and highlight or underline main ideas.
    • Pay special attention to the beginning paragraph or two of the article. This is where the author will most likely lay out their thesis for the entire article. Figure out what the thesis is and determine the main argument or idea that the author or authors are trying to prove with the research.
      • Look for words like hypothesis, results, typically, generally, or clearly to give you hints about which sentence is the thesis.
    • Underline, highlight, or rewrite the main argument of the research in the margins.
  • Maybe, but probably not. It's usually not essential to read research articles word-for-word, as long as you're picking out the main idea, and why the content is there in the first place.
  • 6

    Take notes while you read. Efficiency is key when you're doing research and collecting information from academic journals. Read actively as you comb through the material. Circle or highlight each individual portion of the journal article, focusing on the sub-section titles.[3]
    • These segments will usually include an introduction, methodology, research results, and a conclusion in addition to a listing of references.
  • Part 2 Planning a Draft

    1. 1

      Write down a brief description of the research. In a quick free write, describe the academic journey of the article, listing the steps taken from starting point to concluding results, describing methodology and the form of the study undertaken.
    These will help you discover the main points necessary to summarize.
  • 2

    Decide what aspects of the article are most important. You might refer to these as the main supporting ideas, or sections, of the article. While these may be marked clearly with subheadings, they may require more work to uncover. Anything that's a major point used to support the main argument of the author needs to be present in the summary.
    • Depending on the research, you may want to describe the theoretical background of the research, or the assumptions of the researchers. In scientific writing, it's important to clearly summarize the hypotheses the researchers outlined before undertaking the research, as well as the procedures used in following through with the project. Summarize briefly any statistical results and include a rudimentary interpretation of the data for your summary.
    • In humanities articles, it's usually good to summarize the fundamental assumptions and the school of thought from which the author comes, as well as the examples and the ideas presented throughout the article.
  • It's important that you fully examine the meanings of these more complicated terms so that your summary reader can grasp the content as you move forward with the summary.
    • Any words or terms that the author coins need to be included and discussed in your summary.
  • 4

    Aim to keep it brief. Journal summaries don't need to be anywhere close to the length of the articles themselves. The purpose of the summary is to provide a condensed but separate description of the research, either for use for the primary research collector, or to help you redigest the information at a later date in the research process.
    • As a general rule of thumb, you can probably make one paragraph per main point, ending up with no more than 500-1000 words, for most academic articles. For most journal summaries, you'll be writing several short paragraphs that summarize each separate portion of the journal article.
  • Toward the beginning of the article, possibly in the introduction, the authors should discuss the focus of the research study and what the targeted objectives were for conducting the research. This is where your summary should begin. Describe, in your own words, the main argument the authors hope to prove with their research.
    • In scientific articles, usually there is an introduction which establishes the background for the experiment or study, and won't provide you with much to summarize. It will be followed by the development of a research question and testing procedures, though, which are key in dictating the content for the rest of the article.
  • 2

    Discuss the methodology used by the authors. This portion discusses the research tools and methods used during the study.[4] In other words, you need to summarize how the authors or researchers came to the conclusions they came to with first-hand research or data collection.
  • The results of the study will usually be processed data, sometimes accompanied by raw, pre-process data. Only the processed data needs to be included in the summary.
  • 3

    Describe the results. One of the most important parts of the summary needs to be describing what the authors accomplished as a result of their work.[5] Were the authors successful and did they meet their objectives for conducting the research? What conclusions have the authors drawn from this research? What are the implications of this research, as described in the article?
    • Make sure your summary covers the research question, the conclusions/results, and how those results were achieved. These are crucial parts of the article and cannot be left out.
  • 4

    Connect the main ideas presented in the article. For some summaries, it's important to show how the relationships among the ideas presented by the authors develop over the course of the article.
  • Comments

    1. Hobosidozose

      SUMMARIZE IT TO ME IN 20 WORDS OR LESS!

    2. Decisocateh

      PLEASE don"t reveal what"s happening ( or not ) in Trump"s head! Summarize it for us, kindly.

    3. Xuxewolim

      You must be knowing means ( v. ) to summarize or repeat in concise form

    4. Xozewofi

      I"m basically consumed with work right now. Can you summarize or point me to a good summary?

    5. Nihekat

      I think FDA has an option to convene or not for nme’s with caveat that if they don’t, they have to summarize why not in the action letter.

    6. Kalofujud

      How can you summarize you or in a single tweet?

    7. Logalevecinigu

      Since I"ll be leaving for Italy tomorrow and it being unlikely I"ll have internet or time to live tweet, think I"ll just summarize.

    8. Quxuhorufewek

      I"ve been asleep for six hours. Someone please summarize the three or more hair-raising things that must have happened during that time.

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