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Sat essay lesson plan

Following a format
gives you the confidence that you can finish in the time limit
ensures you cover the topic adequately
gives a sensible structure to your essay

FORMAT I - The one-example essay

Select one suitable illustrative example from your personal experience, or your reading, or knowledge of current affairs, history, science etc. and use this as the basis for a discussion of the topic. The example should be specific and ‘real’ rather than invented. It is best to avoid religion or politics or anything controversial.

There is no word limit but a limited space is provided. The space you have to fill is approximately one and a half sides of A4 paper. The space is sufficient to write a five-paragraph essay. You will have to write in pencil.

Paragraph 1: Introduction

Try to create interest in the topic.
The introduction can be general but must include a thesis statement to point the reader in the right direction.

Paragraph 2: Part I of the example

Describe the situation and cover about half the “example” here.

Paragraph 3: Part II of the example

Finish the “example”.

Paragraph 4: Discussion/analysis

Explain what your example shows. Extract the conclusions/moral lessons to show how it supports your thesis.

Paragraph 5: General conclusion

Show how the example leads to more general conclusions about the topic. (If possible, relate to material from the introduction to round the essay off.)

Sample essay

SAT Sample essay 1 is an essay that uses this format

FORMAT II - The two-example essay

Paragraph 1: Introduction

Explain, in your own words, what the issue is. Include a thesis statement, which is a clear statement of your point of view.

Paragraph 2: Point one in support of your thesis

Explain the point you are making with the aid of a specific example.

Paragraph 3: Point two in support of your thesis

Explain the point you are making with the aid of a specific example

Paragraph 4: Qualification

Explain that, under certain circumstances, the opposite point of view might be correct. (This is to show that you are aware of all aspects of the issue, even though you are 80-90% convinced of your thesis.) [Sometimes this paragraph is replaced by another point and/or further discussion or reasoning.]

Paragraph 5: Reinforcement of thesis

Show how your viewpoint, despite the qualification you have just made, is more persuasive under the present circumstances.

Sample essay

SAT Sample Essay 2 is an essay that uses this format

Essay Writing Lesson Plan Collection | Scholastic.com

Extract the conclusions/moral lessons to show how it supports your thesis.
Paragraph 5: General conclusion

Show how the example leads to more general conclusions about the topic. (If possible, relate to material from the introduction to round the essay off.)

Sample essay

SAT Sample essay 1 is an essay that uses this format

FORMAT II - The two-example essay

Paragraph 1: Introduction

Explain, in your own words, what the issue is. Include a thesis statement, which is a clear statement of your point of view.

Paragraph 2: Point one in support of your thesis

Explain the point you are making with the aid of a specific example.

  • The two scores for each dimension are added.
  • You’ll receive three scores for the SAT Essay—one for each dimension—ranging from 2–8 points.
  • We train every scorer to hold every student to the same standards, the ones shown here. Learn more about the new SAT Essay.

    Important:

    Did You Take the SAT Before March 2016?

    Reading Scoring Guide

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    • Demonstrates thorough comprehension of the source text.
    • Shows an understanding of the text’s central idea(s) and of most important details and how they interrelate, demonstrating a comprehensive understanding of the text.
    • Is free of errors of fact or interpretation with regard to the text.
    • Makes skillful use of textual evidence (quotations, paraphrases, or both), demonstrating a complete understanding of the source text.
  • Makes appropriate use of textual evidence (quotations, paraphrases, or both), demonstrating an understanding of the source text.
    • Demonstrates some comprehension of the source text.
    • Shows an understanding of the text’s central idea(s) but not of important details.
    • May contain errors of fact and/or interpretation with regard to the text.
    • Makes limited and/or haphazard use of textual evidence (quotations, paraphrases, or both), demonstrating some understanding of the source text.
    • Demonstrates little or no comprehension of the source text.
    • Fails to show an understanding of the text’s central idea(s), and may include only details without reference to central idea(s).
    • May contain numerous errors of fact and/or interpretation with regard to the text.
  • Offers a thorough, well-considered evaluation of the author’s use of evidence, reasoning, and/or stylistic and persuasive elements, and/or feature(s) of the student’s own choosing.
  • Contains relevant, sufficient, and strategically chosen support for claim(s) or point(s) made.
  • Focuses consistently on those features of the text that are most relevant to addressing the task.
    • Offers an effective analysis of the source text and demonstrates an understanding of the analytical task.
    • Competently evaluates the author’s use of evidence, reasoning, and/or stylistic and persuasive elements, and/or feature(s) of the student’s own choosing.
    • Contains relevant and sufficient support for claim(s) or point(s) made.
    • Focuses primarily on those features of the text that are most relevant to addressing the task.

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