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Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job

Law School Lowdown

About the author

Author Ian E. Scott is a Harvard Law School graduate, lawyer and author of Law School Lowdown. Prior to law school, he worked as an investment banker and as a Certified Public Accountant with an M.B.A. He created this blog to
assist current and prospective law students that have questions about law school, the bar examination and finding a law-related job.

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October 17, 2016

Did you Know? That on October 16 in the year 1854, Abraham Lincoln made his famous speech in Peoria, IL, making specific arguments against slavery. Horace White, a young journalist with the Chicago Evening Journal wrote of Lincoln’s style of speaking: “Progressing with his theme, his words began to come faster and his face to light up with the rays of genius and his body to move in unison with his thoughts. His gestures were made with his body and head rather than with his arms. His speaking went to the heart because it came from the heart. I have heard celebrated orators who could start thunders of applause without changing any man’s opinion. Mr. Lincoln’s eloquence was of the higher type, which produced conviction in others because of the conviction of the speaker himself. His listeners felt that he believed every word he said, and that, like Martin Luther, he would go to the stake rather than abate one jot or tittle of it. In such transfigured moments as these he was the type of the ancient Hebrew prophet as I learned that character at Sunday-school in my childhood.” Photo taken by our Founder, Ian Scott on a recent trip to the Capitol. #scottlegal #abrahamlincoln #peoria #illinois #abolitionist #nonimmigrant #immigration #immigrationlaw #immigrationattorney #immigrationlawyer #tourist #touristvisa #visa #newyork #newyorkcity #nyc #ny #tribeca #usa #e2 #investor #investorvisa #nyattorney #investorvisa #smallbiz #corporations #treatyinvestor #legalcounsel #immigrationlawfirm #nyclawfirm #nylawfirm #lawfirm
(at 40 Worth St)

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October 4, 2016

Originally posted by pennytlr

Five graduates of Indiana Tech Law School have filed appeals with the Indiana Board of Law Examiners to have their bar exams reviewed, according to the law school’s dean Charles Cercone.

The Fort Wayne law school had only one graduate of its charter classpass the July 2016 Indiana Bar Exam. However since the results were announced, the school has maintained the pass rate could not be determined until the appeals process has been completed.

Cercone, speaking publically for the first time since the bar exam results were announced, said he is confident the law school will turn the results around. The school is offering a “very expensive re-taker program” to the graduates free of charge and is offering other bar prep and doctrinal courses to the graduates and the current third-year students.

“If they do what we tell them to do, they’ll pass,” Cercone said.

At the start of classes in August, Indiana Tech Law School welcomed its largest class ever with 55 new students. Cercone said the law school had a meeting with the student body about the bar results and the students are supportive and committed to working together.

Click here to learn more.

For more law school tips, get your copy of Law School Lowdown: Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job, your blueprint for legal accomplishment on Amazon.

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August 23, 2016

Hey law students!

We apologize for being MIA, but we are back just in time for the start of classes.

We will be doing a series of tips to get you through you through law school, so stay tuned!

Here’s a helpful article from Above The Law.

There is no electronic tool to help you brief cases, but there are resources out there - so don’t fret! You can read it here.

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May 17, 2016

Originally posted by the-suicide-effect

Above the Law recently reported on the struggle that some law students go through - many suffer from high rates of depression and binge drinking.

According to a special report by the National Law Journal, law students suffer from depression, anxiety and substance abuse at unusually high rates.

18% of the 3,000 law students form 15 law schools surveyed said that they’d been diagnosed with depression, with 1 in 6 students diagnosed with depression while in law school. 37% screened positive for anxiety, and 14% met the definition for severe anxiety. Depression coupled with severe anxiety can lead to alcohol and drug abuse, and 22% of law students survey respondents reported that they were binge drinkers.

Unfortunately, upon graduation, these problems do not improve but seem to only get worse. According to a study, 1 in three lawyers say they have a drinking problem, and 28% of them suffer from depression. Among those who reported problem drinking 27% say their problems started in law school.

If you suffer from depression, anxiety or substance abuse, it is important to remember that YOU ARE NOT ALONE, and these studies give support to that.

Make use of the services offered in your law school. According to the National Law Journal article,

In addition to offering wellness programs such as yoga, meditation, mindfulness classes and therapy dogs during final exams, a growing number of schools are bringing on full-time counselors, incorporating mental health and substance-abuse discussions into orientation, and establishing reporting networks where faculty and students can identify classmates who are struggling and get them help.

There are other resources outside of law school. If you are or someone you know is depressed and in need help, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) or a lawyer assistance program in your state.

For more law school tips, get your copy of Law School Lowdown: Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job, your blueprint for legal accomplishment on Amazon.

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May 13, 2016

Originally posted by teendotcom

Congrats, graduates!

Cheers to you for giving it your all - the time, energy and hard work - everything that you’ve poured into your law degree culminates in that JD diploma.

Whatever your plans are after law school, we wish you the best of luck! We know you can do it!

Originally posted by positiveaffirmationsandthinking

For more law school tips, get your copy of Law School Lowdown: Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job, your blueprint for legal accomplishment on Amazon.

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May 12, 2016

Originally posted by thegryffindorpupil

Happy Thursday, readers!

Finals are (or will soon be) over! Don’t forget to treat yourself - spend time with family and friends, eat some ice cream, take a trip, get a massage - reward yourself after a year of reading cases and IRAC-ing.

Love,

Law School Low Down

For more law school tips, get your copy of Law School Lowdown: Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job, your blueprint for legal accomplishment on Amazon.

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May 6, 2016

Originally posted by makemewannaeat

EXAM TIP: Dedicate at least forty hours to studying for the MPRE. Do not be fooled into thinking that it is a common sense exam or that you can wing it; some people do fail it and have to rewrite it. While retaking it is not a big deal, it is a bit embarrassing and may impact your confidence for the bar exam.

For more law school tips, get your copy of Law School Lowdown: Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job, your blueprint for legal accomplishment on Amazon.

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May 5, 2016

Originally posted by thecollegegrind

The MPRE is based on the law governing how lawyers should conduct themselves when dealing with the public, in courtrooms and with other lawyers. The examination deals with rules of professional conduct set out by the states, including disciplinary conduct for bad conduct. For example, you will learn that it is a breach of your conduct to comingle client funds with your own.

The MPRE is not an easy exam, but it is fair. If you study for approximately thirty-five hours, you will do fine. You may also listen to a four-hour lecture that is hosted by an organization like Barbri, which is very helpful. Barbri will also give you sample exams and outlines to practice. This organization has been around for decades and offers bar exam preparation courses for students. The bar exam preparation courses are discussed in more detail in the Bar Examination section of this book.

Although most people pass the MPRE, do not be fooled and think that you can take the exam without studying or that everything on the exam will be common sense. I know at least two people from Harvard who failed on their first attempt. I know another from Brooklyn Law School who achieved a score of 84, so he had to take the exam again since a passing score in New York is 85.

For more law school tips, get your copy of Law School Lowdown: Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job, your blueprint for legal accomplishment on Amazon.

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May 4, 2016

Image courtesy of Josh Davis on Flickr, labeled for reuse.

You should sit for the MPRE in August prior to starting your third year of law school if you can. While most people sit for the exam in November during their third year of law school, it is only because they hear of the exam for the first time when they start their third year.

August is a much better time to sit for the exam because it will not distract you from your coursework. Moreover, you will have a gigantic smile on your face when most of your classmates are sitting for the exam in November.

I made the mistake of sitting for the exam in November, which happened to be in the middle of a busy semester. If I knew about the August sitting, I definitely would have taken it then.

For more law school tips, get your copy of Law School Lowdown: Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job, your blueprint for legal accomplishment on Amazon.

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May 3, 2016 image

Originally posted by original-indie

The Multi-State Professional Responsibility Exam (MPRE) is a sixty-question two-hour multiple-choice exam that you are required to sit for either before or after you take the bar examination. Ten of the questions are test questions and are not graded, but you will not know which ten questions are practice questions.

Most people sit for the examination before taking the bar, and in some states it is a prerequisite to sit for the bar exam. In other states - for example, New York - you may complete the MPRE up to three years after sitting for the bar examination.

The MPRE is required to practice law in all but four jurisdictions, and a passing scaled score ranges from 76-86. A passing score in New York is 85, which equates to approximately thirty-three to thirty-five questions correct our of the fifty graded questions.

You will not experience any time pressure on the examination (you are given two hours), and most finish with plenty of time to spare. Also, most people sit for the MPRE in November during their third year of law school. While most sit for the exam in November, it is also offered at other times of the year, such as in August.

For more law school tips, get your copy of Law School Lowdown: Secrets of Success from the Application Process to Landing the First Job, your blueprint for legal accomplishment on Amazon.

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