02 05

How do you show a movie title in an essay

How to Reference a Film in an Essay | The Pen and The Pad

Best Answer: Use italics. Underlining was a substitute for italics when people used typewriters that did not have italics. My old copy of the "MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers" (I can't get italics here!) says use quotation marks for short poems, short stories, songs, essays, chapters in a book, episodes of television programs, lectures, and articles in newspapers, magazines, and encyclopedias. They use italics for everything else except they get weird about instrumental musical compositions, saying Berlioz's >Symphonie fantastique< (in italics), but Beethoven's Symphony no. 7 in A (no italics or quotes because it's identified by form, number, and key).

Source(s): http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_overvw.html
This deals only with italics, leaving you to wonder about the things not in the list (which would need quotation marks). I couldn't find a really complete site.

netathy1 · 1 decade ago

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However, if it is a poem, article, short story, etc.. these are not physically able to sit on shelves, and in this case, you put them in quotations.

Actually . . . the use of underlining is pretty much gone now. Underlining was originally used in a manuscript to indicate that something was to be italicized in print. Now that you have the ability to word process, it's only used now when writing in long hand.

Yes, you may underline movie titles or put them in italics. <br /><br /> A way to remember this is to ask yourself if it would be able to sit on a shelf. <br /> Because movies, books, and such are able to sit on a shelf, you underline them. <br /><br /> However, if it is a poem, article, short story, etc.. these are not physically able to sit on shelves, and in this case, you put them in quotations.

The four most common writing formats used in United States schools are MLA, AP, Chicago and APA styles. Many teachers and professors will discount points for using the wrong referencing system, so it is important to find out the style formatting required for your essay before choosing a referencing system to use for films. If you have any referencing questions, ask your teacher for help before submitting the essay.
MLA

Reference the video in-text differently than you would for printed sources. Since there are no page numbers, you can cite the video by director and title. Write the full name of the director, and italicize the name of the film.

Cite the source using the following formatting in your “Works Cited” page: Tile of film (italicized). Dir. Director's last name, director's first initial. Distributor, year. Format (DVD, videocassette, online film).

Reference additional information between the title and distributor of the film.

Reference the citation like this: Name of film (italicized). Format. Directed by Director's first name and last name. Year of theatrical release; Location of the studio City, State abbreviation: Film distributor, home viewing release year.

AP

Cite the film in essay by the title of the film only. Place quotation marks around the title, rather than italicizing the title. Capitalize the first and last word in the title, as well as all principle words. Capitalize verbs and prepositions if they contain more than three letters.

Cite the name of the director or name of an actor in a film if you reference them specifically in the text. Introduce the director or actor in a relevant way; like, "as evidenced by the work 'Director' did in the film 'Film.'"

Cite the film at the end of the essay. Place the title of the film in quotation marks. Place the name of the director using first name, last name.

) says use quotation marks for short poems, short stories, songs, essays, chapters in a book, episodes of television programs, lectures, and articles in newspapers, magazines, and encyclopedias. They use italics for everything else except they get weird about instrumental musical compositions, saying Berlioz's >Symphonie fantastique< (in italics), but Beethoven's Symphony no. 7 in A (no italics or quotes because it's identified by form, number, and key).

Source(s): http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_overvw.html
This deals only with italics, leaving you to wonder about the things not in the list (which would need quotation marks). I couldn't find a really complete site.

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