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Newspaper articles on pollution in india

newspaper articles on pollution in india According to India’s Central Pollution Control Board, in 2010, particulate matter in the air of 180 Indian cities was six times higher than World Health Organization standards. More people die of asthma in India than anywhere else in the world. Indoor air pollution, mostly from cooking fires, and outdoor air pollution are the third and fifth leading causes of death in India.

Automobile sales in India have boomed, and diesel is the fuel of choice. Many industries pollute with impunity, defying existing environmental laws and regulations. Pollution monitoring in India is a haphazard affair. Industries know that even if they are caught polluting, criminal prosecution will take years to go through India’s overburdened courts.

The best hope for reining in air pollution lies with India’s Supreme Court. It has handed down a series of landmark environmental decisions, including mandating the use of compressed natural gas in public-service vehicles in Delhi in 1985.

Every night immense convoys like this one snake their way into the Indian capital, belching sulphurous diesel smoke. The sinking winter air presses the resulting smog tight over the city.

The lorries are a chief reason why Delhi’s air is now more toxic than any other city’s on earth. Admittedly Beijing has a worse reputation, with its visible smog from particulates of 10 microns or smaller, known as PM10. Delhi’s grim distinction is that it has even higher levels of PM10, as well as of the smaller particulates, PM2.5, that are more likely to kill because they go deeper into the lungs. Levels of PM2.5 in Delhi are routinely 15 times above levels considered safe by the World Health Organisation. New data suggest that, on this score, Delhi’s air has been 45% more polluted than that of the Chinese capital for the past couple of years.

1 million collected from them.
  • Delhi News | Press Trust of India | Sunday January 8, 2017

    The decision to make middle and inner circular roads of Connaught Place a vehicle-free zone will bring back the "diminished glory" of the famed market and inculcate love and respect for architectural heritage among people, experts say.

  • World News | Press Trust of India | Thursday January 5, 2017

    China's national observatory today renewed alerts for air pollution and fog across the country as the gleaming white bullet trains turned dark brown while travelling in pollution hit areas, major expressways closed and over flights getting cancelled.

  • Delhi News | Press Trust of India | Thursday December 29, 2016

    Delhi's air quality today entered the 'severe' zone yet again after steadily deteriorating over the last two days and it may dip further.

  • Delhi News | Press Trust of India | Saturday December 24, 2016

    Air quality in the national capital has steadily deteriorated to 'severe' level yet again, a condition that will persist over the Christmas weekend when people will come out in large numbers to soak in the festive spirit.

  • 5 years shorter on average because of air pollution. In a forthcoming article, he applies the same methods to assess the 660m Indians most exposed to toxic air. He concludes that they would each live over three years longer, on average, if their air met national standards.

    A former UN chief negotiator on climate change, Yvo de Boer, suggests that air pollution costs China the equivalent of a tenth or more of GDP and he warns India to avoid that fate. He urges India to “industrialise in a cleaner way”. And a study of agriculture in India from 1980 to 2010 found soaring levels of ozone and other air pollution, which has led to wheat yields a third lower than would otherwise have been expected.

    India’s leaders are starting to act, pressed by anti-smog campaigns such as the one by the Times of India to “let Delhi breathe”.

    The report recommends a series of measures, including a 30 percent tax on the sale of diesel vehicles, higher automobile registration and parking fees, and getting more buses on Delhi’s roads.

    The Supreme Court should use its authority to order compliance with these recommendations. And India’s national air-quality standards must be made legally binding.

    The World Bank says that environmental degradation is costing India $80 billion annually and accounts for 23 percent of the nation’s child mortality. The bank estimated that reducing particulate emissions by 30 percent by 2030 would save India $105 billion in health-related costs. So far, pollution has not been an issue ahead of general elections in May. The Supreme Court could help make it one.

    A version of this editorial appears in print on February 14, 2014, in The International New York Times.

  • Delhi News | Press Trust of India | Sunday December 18, 2016

    Six neighbouring states of Delhi have been asked by the National Green Tribunal why they should not be directed to completely stop the operation of diesel buses coming to the national capital.

  • India News | Press Trust of India | Saturday December 17, 2016

    Congress Vice President Rahul Gandhi has said that his mother and party chief Sonia Gandhi preferred Goa over Delhi, as she felt that there was "no pollution" in the state and the people were "very good".

  • World News | Press Trust of India | Friday December 16, 2016

    Bracing for heavy smog, Beijing city will implement the road rationing scheme "odd-even" from tonight and suspend schools bracing for heavy smog after the Chinese capital issued its first red alert for air pollution this year.

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